Over a 45+-year career, Myron M. Levine, MD, a pioneer of the modern discipline of vaccinology, has made fundamental innovative contributions to research on infectious diseases, vaccine development, and vaccine implementation, with a focus on specific infections that constitute major causes of disease and death among children and adults in developing countries. NFID is proud to honor Dr. Levine with the 2017 Maxwell Finland Award for Scientific Achievement for his impressive accomplishments in global public health.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has designated April 22-29, 2017 as National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), an annual observance highlighting the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases and celebrating the achievements of immunization programs and partners in promoting healthy communities. As NIIW coincides with the 2017 Annual Conference on Vaccine Research (April 24-26, 2017), […]

The history of the smallpox vaccine is just the beginning of the story of how vaccines have transformed global public health. Indeed, vaccines are among the most significant achievements in public health. Between 1924-2013, childhood vaccinations prevented more than 100 million cases of serious disease.

Through a combination of scientific excellence, policy strategy, strong communication, and global activism, Peter Piot, MD, PhD has played pivotal roles in two defining global infectious disease epidemics of our time – AIDS and Ebola and is one of the most influential global public health leaders.

Caroline had been vaccinated against the flu every year except this particular year. The vaccine wasn’t readily available prior to the beginning of school and once the busy school year began, it fell off the “radar.” Caroline’s mother admits, “The fact that we neglected to make it a priority was the biggest mistake I’ve ever made as a parent. That mistake and lack of judgment nearly stole my child’s life and has changed our entire family’s lives forever…”

There are an estimated 1 million cases of shingles each year in the US and the risk of shingles increases as you get older. About half of all cases occur in men and women age 60 years or older. Almost 1 out of every 3 adults in the US will develop shingles, also known as zoster or herpes zoster, in their lifetime.

In the US, adults age 65 years and older are disproportionately impacted by influenza (flu) every year. There are far more flu-related deaths and hospitalizations in adults age 65 years and older than any other age group…